Microgreens: Small Stalks Do Not Replace Regular Vegetables

A handful of stalks with small leaves attached replaces the recommended three servings of vegetables a day? It would be nice – but the supposed superfood can’t do that. Because the little plant seedlings are missing something.

The consumption of certain plant seedlings is considered healthy. This includes cress. Beetroot, spinach or mustard are also popular – red cabbage, broccoli or radish are also available in small sizes. However, the mini-plants (microgreens), which are sown in soil or substrate and cut off after two to three weeks above the root, cannot replace “normal” sized vegetables in the daily diet, according to the consumer advice center in Bremen.

Not enough fiber in microgreens

Although a small portion of the stalks may provide the body with many vitamins, what the microgreens lack in terms of quantity compared to the full-grown vegetables is dietary fiber in the form of plant fibers. These are important for satiety and a healthy digestive system.

The small plants are therefore particularly suitable as a decoration or topping for salads or bread – they could also provide the extra portion of vitamins and minerals in smoothies.

Tip: Eat packaged sprouts as soon as possible

Anyone who buys germinated plants such as cress packaged should consume them promptly, recommends the Bremen consumer advice centre. Listeria and other germs could easily multiply in the packaging. Microgreens should always be washed thoroughly before consumption.

The consumer advocates explain the terminology: Microgreens are germinated plants that have developed two to three leaves. The German word for this is Schössling. They should therefore grow a little longer than sprouts. In contrast to sprouts, the seeds of saplings are not eaten.

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